H epatic p o rtal circulation and p ulm onary circulation • Figure 11.17
The pulmonary circulation and the hepatic portal circulation have features that differ
from systemic circulation patterns.
a.
Pulmonary circulation
Superior vena cava
Right pulmonary artery
Pulmonary trunk-------
Right pulmonary veins
Arch of aorta
Ascending aorta
Left pulmonary artery
Left pulmonary veins
Right lung
Left lung
Diaphragm
Abdominal aorta
Inferior vena cava
Left atrium
The
femoral veins
are
the
continuations
of the
popliteal veins. They drain the muscles of the thigh,
femur, external genitals, and superficial lymph nodes.
There are two other circulation pathways in the body: the
pulmonary circulation and the hepatic portal circulation.
Let’s take a closer look at these two systems.
The Pulmonary and Hepatic Portal
Circulations Are Somewhat Different
In the systemic circulation, arteries carry oxygenated
blood away from the heart, and veins carry deoxygen-
ated blood toward the heart. The pulmonary circulation
and the hepatic portal circulation do not exactly fit this
pattern.
In the pulmonary circulation, the pulmonary trunk
emerges from the right ventricle, carrying deoxygen-
ated blood (
Figure 11.17a
). It divides into the right
and left pulmonary arteries, which are the only arter-
ies in the body to carry deoxygenated blood. Conversely,
the pulmonary veins return oxygenated blood from the
lungs to the left atrium. These are the only veins in the
body that carry oxygenated blood.
In hepatic portal circulation (
Figure 11.17b
), the
liver receives venous blood from the gastrointestinal
tract through a
portal vein
called the
hepatic portal
330 CHAPTER 11
The Cardiovascular System: Heart, Blood Vessels, and Circulation
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