Cardiac Muscle Tissue is Found
Only in the Heart
Cardiac muscle tissue
makes up the walls of the heart
and generates the force necessary to pump your blood.
Cardiac muscle contractions are
involuntary:
You don’t
think about contracting and relaxing this muscle. Unlike
most other muscle tissue, cardiac muscle tissue has the
ability to contract without the assistance of the nervous
system. Like skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle is striated.
The regeneration ability of cardiac muscle is minimal.
Smooth Muscle Tissue is Found
in Most Body Organs
Smooth muscle tissue
forms the walls of hollow organs
such as blood vessels, airways, the stomach, the intestines,
and the uterus. The smooth muscle of these organs helps
to store and move substances within the body and regu-
lates organ volume. Smooth muscle cells are considerably
smaller than other muscle cells and are not striated. Like
cardiac muscle, the contraction and relaxation of smooth
muscle is
involuntary.
Of the three types of musclar tissue,
smooth muscle tissue regenerates most easily, most likely
because this type of muscle has a less complex structure
than that of the striated cardiac or skeletal muscle tissues.
CONCEPT CHECK
1.
Which
type of muscular tissue is striated and
voluntary?
2.
What
type of muscular tissue will an obstetri-
cian be cutting through to deliver a baby via
cesarean section?
3.
Which
types of muscular tissue play a role in
generating body heat?
b.
Cardiac
muscle tissue
Branched cylindrical fiber (cell),
usually with one centrally located
nucleus; intercalated discs join
neighboring fibers; striated
Serous
membrane
500x
c.
Smooth muscle tissue
Fiber (cell) is thickest in
the middle, tapered at
each end, has one centrally
located nucleus; not striated
Longitudinal section of cardiac muscle tissue
Epithelial
tissue
Nucleus of smooth
muscle fiber
500x
Longitudinal section of smooth muscle tissue
The Body Contains Three Types of Muscular Tissues 155
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