A typical long bone, such as the humerus from the arm,
exemplifies the characteristics of bone structure.
Parts of a long bone • Figure 5.1
Epiphysis
(e-PIF-i-sis)
is the end
Proxim al e p ip h ysis
------------
Metaphysis
(me-TAF-i-sis) —
contains the epiphyseal plate
in a growing bone
Diaphysis
(di-AF-i-sis)
is the shaft or body
Metaphysis
D istal epiphysis
Articular cartilage
is a thin layer of cartilage that
reduces friction and absorbs shock at movable joints
Spongy bone
contains red marrow
R ed m arrow
produces blood cells and platelets
Epiphyseal line
(ep'-i-FIZ-e-al) is a
remnant of the epiphyseal plate in a non-growing
bone
Compact bone
is the hard, dense,
mineral-containing bone tissue
Endosteum
(en-DOS-te-um) is the membrane
that lines the medullary (marrow) cavity
Nutrient artery
brings blood to the bone tissue
Medullary cavity
(MED-U-lar'-e) or marrow cavity
is the space that contains yellow marrow
Periosteum
(per'-e-OS-te-um) is the membrane
that covers bone and consists of connective tissue,
osteogenic cells, and osteoblasts. It is essential for
bone growth, repair, and nutrition.
Articular cartilage
The Structure of Bone Controls Function and Growth 115
previous page 150 Craig Freudenrich, Gerard J  Tortora   Visualizing Anatomy and Physiology   2011 read online next page 152 Craig Freudenrich, Gerard J  Tortora   Visualizing Anatomy and Physiology   2011 read online Home Toggle text on/off